Monthly Archives: July 2009

Window Cleaning Tips and Tools

Window cleaning can be very hard and even sometimes seem impossible for someone with no cleaning knowledge or experience. I spoke with Joann Anderson, a cleaner and small window cleaning business owner to see if I could get some unique cleaning tips.

She uses T-bars and sleeve washers. The T-bar is the handle the washing pad goes on or over. This pad is known as a scrubber or sleeve to scrub the window and clean the window before a squeegee is used. She was telling me about her squeegees, channels, rubber and handles and explaining about the t-bars and washers pads.

We talked a lot about quality t-bars, washers or sleeves and or pads, squeegees, squeegee rubber inserts, channels and squeegee handles. She made a very good point about quality cleaning tools and how they come in separate pieces. For example, if you were un-educated in cleaning and you went to your local store to get a washer pad or squeegee for your windows, you might see a squeegee all in one piece or a scrubber pad all in one piece.

These are usually the irreplaceable type of window cleaning tools. Once they are used they don’t come with replacements and or the refill parts are not available. If you are doing some cleaning and you need to get some tools. It always pays off to get quality tools and once they’re used you can always get replacement parts for the next time you do your window cleaning. One of Joann’s tips is to go to a window cleaning supply store instead of a hardware store where you can get quality window cleaning equipment. Joann made alot of good points about quality cleaning tools.

I guess you can say we window cleaners never really think about it and we just take it for granted that everybody would know about quality window cleaning tools. Another example is that a quality squeegee will usually come in three parts. The handle, the channel and the rubber. These parts are all bought separately. This is an easy way to tell if you’re buying quality tools for your window cleaning job.

Joann also gave me another tip about how she uses a micro fiber cloth to go over the bad areas such as water spots and streaks and edges of the window. This is probably another method we cleaners take for granted that everybody knows and it is a very good tip for new window cleaners. For more cleaning education check out Joann at:

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Posted in Roof Cleaning | 4 Comments

Pricing Window Cleaning Work

CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning Trucks

CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning Trucks

CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning Technicians
CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning Technicians
Window Cleaning French Panes
Wndow Cleaning French Panes
CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning North Hollywood
CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning North Hollywood
CHD Custom Home Detailing Commercial Window Cleaning
CHD Custom Home Detailing Commercial Window Cleaning
CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning
CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning
CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning In Venice

CHD Custom Home Detailing Window Cleaning In Venice

Pricing window cleaning work for your small business is an art. The process is simple math. You come up with the price per window you’re going to clean. Now, here is the tricky part. You must be able to do the math, count the windows, and come up with a good bid that gives you and your workers plenty of time to do a good job. I have seen and been around many of window cleaners that bid window cleaning work too low. When window cleaners bid their work too low, it usually means they are inexperienced, desperate and do not have the proper tools, insurance and even patience do do the job well. I am talking about residential window cleaning right now.

Residential window cleaning is different from commercial and priced totally different. For information on commercial window cleaning, I will leave the link at the end of the article.
I also don’t know where you live or what the cost of living is where you live, so pricing might be a little different for you, if you are on the East Coast compared to here on the West Coast. First, establish a price for standard windows inside and out. A standard window is any window which is not a small french pane or an unusually large wall of glass. I am using french panes as an example. This means the window can have lots of little panes and you would charge differently than for a standard window or a wall to wall window, which would be priced differently. For example, standard windows might be 8 to 10 dollars a window and a small french pane could start at $1.00 to $1.50 – $3.00. There are also panes that are priced at $5.00 a pane depending on how many panes of glass are in the window. Pricing for tracks and screens also changes the cost by a $1.50 or so.

Now, we are not saying this pricing is set in stone. I am giving you this example, because it has worked for me very successfully. Also, this method is used for residential window cleaning. Commercial window cleaning is very different. The pricing is lower. Don’t confuse the two; we are discussing residential window cleaning in this article.

Go to pricing and biding Commercial window cleaning for that info. I will make this crystal clear how to price your pane of glass because it is sometimes hard to do the math when panes are different sizes. A normal sliding window, which slides up and down or side to side is usually $5.00 to $6.00 per pane without screens or tracks for which we charge $1.50 for screens and $1.50 for tracks. Pricing french …

Posted in Window Cleaning Orange County | 139 Comments